Court Compels Arbitration of Non-Compete Claim Based on Arbitration Clause in Separate Agreement

Non-Compete, Non-Solicit, Arbitration Provision, DTSA, Illinois

A federal court, in a non-competition setting, had to untangle the relationship between three separate agreements. One contained an arbitration provision but the others did not. Ultimately, the court determined that some parties had to arbitrate some claims but that others did not have to arbitrate.  Continue reading

Restrictive Covenant Drafting: Ten Tips to Avoid the Traps

Non-Compete, Non-Solicit, Restrictive Covenants

Tip 1: Choose your choice of law wisely and FIRST.

  • The law you choose to apply to a restrictive covenant is regularly outcome determinative in enforcement proceedings (e.g. Illinois’ rule on at-will employment as consideration, North Carolina’s rule on blue-penciling, Louisiana’s law on geographic scope, Florida’s statute on presumptive validity, etc.) 
  • And there are sometimes three or four states from which to pick:
    • where the employer or seller is located (state of incorporation or principal place of business)
    • where the employee or purchaser is located
    • where the place of performance is located.  
  • So take the opportunity to pick the law that is most likely to do what your client already presumes will be done: your restrictive covenants will be enforced.
  • Relatively speaking, Delaware –often the default state of incorporation– is a solid and defensible choice.

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Don’t Let Your Nondisclosure Provisions Convert Your Employment Agreement Into An Unenforceable Non-Compete

Nondisclosure, Non-Compete, Fay v. Total Quality Logistics, DTSA

In Fay v. Total Quality Logistics, LLC, the South Carolina Appellate Court determined that the confidentiality provision in an employment agreement was so broad that it needed to be reviewed under the standards applicable to non-competition agreements and, because it lacked a durational provision, held it unenforceable.   Continue reading

The Difficulties in Obtaining Relief Under the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016

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The Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (“DTSA”) provides a new tool in the form of an ex parte seizure for businesses and individuals to safeguard their trade secrets after misappropriation has occurred. Unfortunately, many trade secret owners have discovered that obtaining this form of relief is no easy task. Continue reading

2016 Trade Secret/Restrictive Covenant Year-In-Review

2016, DTSA, Illinois, White House, Guidance to HR

Having flipped the calendar over to a new year, here’s a look back at some of the developments in trade secrets and restrictive covenants that shaped the law in 2016. Some major developments came not from the courts, but from the legislative and executive branches—both federal and state.
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Can Business Contacts On An Employee’s LinkedIn Account Be A Protectable Trade Secret?

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Over the last few years, ownership of LinkedIn contacts has become a continuing source of disputes. If employees decide, or are even encouraged, to connect with an employer’s customers on LinkedIn, must they “unlink” with those contacts when they leave the company? According to a California federal court, an employee’s retention of those contacts “might” be considered misappropriation of the employer’s trade secrets.

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